Capturing Entanglement – a conversation with Stevan Nadj-Perge

nadj-perge

Stevan Nadj-Perge, joined Caltech and IQIM in January as assistant professor of applied physics and materials science. “A large part of my research is focused on finding ways to store and process quantum information. Typically, if you have a quantum system, it loses its coherent properties—and therefore, its ability to store quantum information—very quickly. Quantum information is very fragile and even the smallest amount of external noise messes up quantum states. This is true for all quantum systems. There are various schemes that tackle this problem and postpone decoherence, but the one that I’m most interested in involves Majorana fermions. These particles were proposed to exist in nature almost eighty years ago but interestingly were never found.

Relatively recently theorists figured out how to engineer these particles in the lab. It turns out that, under certain conditions, when you combine certain materials and apply high magnetic fields at very cold temperatures, electrons will form a state that looks exactly as you would expect from Majorana fermions. Furthermore, such engineered states allow you to store quantum information in a way that postpones decoherence.”

Nadj-Perge’s lab is working to develop nanodevices to host Marjorana fermions. “Hopefully one day our devices will find applications in quantum computing.” Read the full Caltech Media Interview.

For more about the broad ideas behind using Majorana fermions to capture quantum information, watch Quantum Knots – an IQIM/Jorge Cham animation, featuring Jason Alicea professor of theoretical physics and Gil Refeal professor of theoretical physics and executive officer of physics.
2017-01-13T10:05:27+00:00 May 31st, 2016|News, Uncategorized|0 Comments

Leave A Comment